Another Art Adventure

When we drove to our summer place this weekend, I didn’t expect to begin experimenting with a different medium.  I knew there was a garage sale nearby, of stock from an art shop.  I had never seen the art shop, but had to drop by.  watermarked-cliCC1F

Well the last time I had been to the cabin, I had painted my first Plein Air, of the new house just beyond us in the cove.

Acrylic on 9 x 12 Acrylic Paper.

It was the HOTTEST day, and there was a wind.  (I won’t say breeze – to anyone other than Newfoundlanders it’s a wind.)  The paint was drying before I managed to bring brush to paper.  I was spritzing and on a wet pallette and using blending gel!!!  What a torture!  That was when I decided that I needed to try either different acrylics, or a different medium.

Last week Laura at Create Art Every Day enticed me to try watercolour.  It was not as stress-filled as I expected.  Inspired by a Visitor.  I enjoyed it and will try it again.

20160725_131759This weekend, my random garage sale, netted me some Holbein Duo Aqua water-soluble oil paints.  I didn’t want to come home with a truck-load.  It could have been so.  There were wagon loads of equipment and supplies (literally).  I limited myself to a yellow (Marigold), red (Madder), two blues (Navy and Turquoise), Ivory Black
and a grey (Monochrome 1).  She didn’t have any white, so that grey was as close as I could get. watermarked-SculpinRock Oil.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Voila, my first foray into oils.

This is on a 4 inch square of gessoed cereal box cardboard.  The view from my window.  Didn’t paint outside as it was raining, but it was enough to allow me to experience the texture of the paint.  It is a different process than painting wet into wet acrylic, and you have to remind yourself that it doesn’t dry.  But the rich, buttery texture of the paint is luscious.  And the colours have great depth and intermix beautifully.  And yes, they clean up with soap and water.

I’m quite pleased with it, other than the clouds in my sky.  I realize, looking at the photo, that they are all far too similar.  But in terms of the medium, I’m definitely impressed and will experiment more.

I have to keep reminding myself to “just play.”  I have a failing in that everything I do is looked at as a task with a goal or a product.  I have to let that go.

Enjoy your day, everyone.  And go play.

Advertisements

Look What the Sun Brought Out!

So I’m not usually independently adventurous.   I’ll find lots at home to keep me busy, or at least I’ll use that as an excuse.  On this particular day in April, the family was all either at work or busy and I was at loose ends, so I took my Nikon 3000 and went for a drive to a community down the shore.  It was a “large” day; bright sunlight, light winds, warm air.  These were the moments that caught my eye.

Our Spirit may be free, but our feet are Anchored to the stones of this place.

This memorial stands at the side of the road where houses clutch onto the rocks as though perched to take flight.

Memorial to a Parson’s son killed in action a century ago.

Every community here is built around its churches.  In this fore-yard stand various statuary, erected to do honour to those who have done honour to the community.  This is but one that stands fast and looks out over the bay.  By such markers did the fishers of old guide their punts and their souls to safer berths.

Progress defines new uses for old sites.

Wheels of cable, either steel or electrical, sit at the offshore supply base.  A deep, well protected harbour never goes out of fashion.  Just the materials seem to change.

Pun intended

There’s a boat under there!

As this fishing vessel guts and cleans its catch, gulls wheel and scream, fighting for scraps and gathering numbers until the boat is near invisible.

Neptune’s Daughter

Our marine tradition flavours everything – our music and dance, our stories and science, our architecture and art.  The Mermaids of Avalon are displayed in many sites, beckoning to the wayfarer, singing sailors to watery slumbers, dreaming longingly of the sea.  Symbols of our history, and of our mystery.